engl 322  |  survey of british literature III
 


description
texts
requirements
attendance policy

calendar


weekly writing
guide

study questions
essay exam guide

photo gallery


Professor Lisa Jadwin
St. John Fisher College, Rochester, NY
110 Basil Hall
385-8192 (office)
385-7311 (fax)
email Dr. Jadwin
Office Hours: T/R 9:00-9:30, W 4-6, whenever my door is open, and by appointment

Description and Goals
We will study important literary works from the mid-nineteenth century through the high modern period within their historical contexts, aiming to establish connections across time between different writers, genres, and eras. The course is designed to give you a sense of literary history, an understanding of some central texts, and a grasp of how British literature and its readers have developed in the past century and a half. You will be required to read carefully and to write critically. The course will combine lecture and discussion.

This website, which reflects the outlines of the course only, may not reflect all aspects of the class as it is taught in the current semester. Download the current syllabus for an accurate calendar and list of requirements.

Texts (all required)

Abrams et al.The Norton Anthology of English Literature, 7th edition, Volume II    OR 
Abrams et al., The Victorian Age and The Twentieth Century (Vols 2B and 2C of the Norton Anthology, Vol. II)
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations (Penguin)
Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich)

Requirements
Weekly writings (50% of your final grade). You will prepare for class each week by writing responses to study questions on the week's reading. These writing assignments will help you better understand the readings and prepare you to write about them in greater depth in the midterms and final. Study questions will be due at the start of class each Tuesday. Since we will go over these questions in class, no late writings can be accepted. Your lowest weekly writing grade will be dropped at the end of the semester.

Exams (50% of your final grade). There will be two midterms and a final exam (see calendar on syllabus for exact dates).

Attendance. I will not take attendance in this class. Before you start cheering and planning late-night binges for Mondays and Wednesdays, however, take note. There is no substitute for showing up. It is up to you to attend class regularly unless you are a genius and/or have an eidetic memory. Aim to miss no more than 2 classes. If you have a serious emergency, such as a death in the family, auto accident, hospitalization, etc., please contact me in advance or as soon as possible because it may be desirable for you to withdraw from the class rather than fail outright.

Participation. Students who participate constructively in class learn more, increase the quality of the class, and introduce important ideas and questions. If you participate regularly and constructively (speaking at least once, and preferably more often, per class meeting) you will receive a bonus, based on my estimate of the value of your contribution, on your final grade. Conversely, if your participation is negative - whispering with friends, passing notes, chowing down on a noisy meal, leaving litter behind, sleeping in class, etc. - you will receive a deduction, based on my estimate of the value of your behavior, from your final grade.

I do not reprise class for students who are absent; if you miss class, have another student discuss his or her notes with you. Then, if you have further questions that they are unable to answer, contact me. You're responsible for finding out about any assignments, due dates, and announcements and for fulfilling them on time. Extra handouts and worksheets will be available after class on the front of my office door for pickup anytime.

Readings
How to Prepare for Class
All readings listed on the calendar below are required and you will be tested on them as well as on the information and ideas I present in lecture. Though poetry readings may seem short in number of pages, you are unlikely to understand any poem until you have read it at least three times. An apparently short poetry assignment of ten pages may actually take you longer to read fully than a longer prose assignment. Read with your pen in hand; take notes, underline and look up unfamiliar words, and note questions and ideas you want to introduce later in class. If you have trouble understanding something, mark the point at which you first became confused.

Though I will be explicating some of these readings in class, you will ultimately responsible for understanding all of them to a reasonable degree.

Always read the brief biographical summary that precedes each author's works in the Norton.

Calendar of Readings, Lectures, and Exams
Week 1Introduction to course.
Lecture on key issues and historical context of Victorian period. To increase your knowledge of these ideas, read the essay "The Victorian Age" in the Norton.
Week 2Robert Browning: shorter poems
Weekly Writing Assignment due at beginning of class Tuesday (typed, proofread, single-spaced, 1-2 pp.).
Lecture on Victorian poetry and the interior monologue. Read biographical essay; "Porphyria's Lover," "The Bishop Orders His Tomb at St. Praxed's Church," "Andrea del Sarto," and "Soliloquy in a Spanish Cloister" and "My Last Duchess." Read "Love Among the Ruins," "Memorabilia," "Home-Thoughts, from Abroad," "Fra Lippo Lippi" and "Two in the Campagna."

Lecture notes on Browning (.pdf file)

Lecture notes on the interior monologue (.pdf file)
Week 3Alfred, Lord Tennyson: shorter poems
Weekly Writing Assignment due at beginning of class Tuesday (typed, proofread, single-spaced, 1-2 pp.).
Lecture on elegy; Victorian nostalgia; the lyric.
Read biographical essay; "Ulysses," "The Lady of Shalott," "The Eagle," "Mariana," "Crossing the Bar,""The Epic [Morte D'Arthur]," "Break, Break, Break," "Crossing the Bar," "Flower in the Crannied Wall," "Tears, Idle Tears"

If you are unfamiliar with the Greek myths and Arthurian legends on which many of Tennyson's poems are based, you will want to consult:

Mythweb's condensed version of the story of Odysseus
Introduction to Arthurian legend, from slider.com
A vetted list of scholarly Arthurian websites, from an online syllabus

Lecture notes on Tennyson (.pdf file)
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Listen to Tennyson read the opening of "The Charge of the Light Brigade"
Week 4Thomas Hardy: poems and a short story
Weekly Writing Assignment due at beginning of class Tuesday (typed, proofread, single-spaced, 1-2 pp.).
Lecture on Hardy's dual career; decline of religion; irony; social realism.
Read biographical essay; the short story "On the Western Circuit" and the poems "Hap," "Neutral Tones"; "The Darkling Thrush," "The Impercipient," "A Broken Appointment," "The Trampwoman's Tragedy" and "The Convergence of the Twain."

Lecture notes on Hardy (.pdf file)

Thursday 9/25: Midterm 1. The midterm will require you to (1) identify the source and significance of several brief excerpts from course readings and (2) discuss the significance of a passage from Victorian literature that is representative of the key issues and ideas of the era.
Week 5

Industrialization and culture (Tuesday)
Read "Industrialism: Progress or Decline?" (NA 1696-1719) including Macaulay, from "A Review of Southey's Colloquies;" Engels, from "The Great Towns"; Anonymous, "Poverty Knock;" Mayhew, from London Labour and the London Poor, Besant, "The White Slavery of London Match Workers," Chew, "A Living Wage."

Lecture notes on industrialization (pdf file)

Charles Dickens, Great Expectations (Thursday)
Weekly Writing Assignment due at beginning of class Thursday (typed, proofread, single-spaced, 1-2 pp.).
Lecture on rise of novel; Victorian readership; Dickens's career; themes of crime and punishment in the opening chapters.
Read biographical essay in Norton II/2B (p. 1333) and chapters 1-19 (Volume I).

Overview of Freudian theory from Victorian Web

Week 6Charles Dickens, Great Expectations
Weekly Writing Assignment 5 due at beginning of class Tuesday (typed, proofread, single-spaced, 1-2 pp.).
Lecture on metaphors plots and plotting in Great Expectations.
Read chapters 20-39 (Volume II).

Lecture notes on plot in Great Expectations (.pdf file)
Week 7Charles Dickens, Great Expectations
Weekly Writing Assignment due at beginning of class Tuesday (typed, proofread, single-spaced, 1-2 pp.).
Lecture on psychoanalytical dynamics of the novel; memoir; forgiveness; Dickens's career.
Read chapters 40-59 (Volume III).

Lecture notes on resolution of plot in Great Expectations (.pdf file)

Lecture notes on mothers in Great Expectations ((.pdf file)
Week 8

No Weekly Writing Assignment assignment due today. (Use extra time to review for midterm.)
Thursday 10/23 : Midterm 2.
The midterm will require you to (1) identify the source and significance of several brief excerpts from course readings and (2) discuss the significance of a passage from Victorian literature that is representative of the key issues and ideas of the era.

Week 9Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest
Weekly Writing Assignment due at beginning of class Tuesday (typed, proofread, single-spaced, 1-2 pp.).
Lecture on fin-de-siècle decadence; drama in the nineteenth century.
Read "The Nineties"; biographical essay; "Preface" to The Picture of Dorian Gray, and William Butler Yeats's short memoir "[Oscar Wilde]" (Norton II/2C).
Read "The Importance of Being Earnest" (Acts I, II and III). 

Lecture notes on The Importance of Being Earnest (.pdf file)

Lecture notes on The Importance of Being Earnest (.pdf file)

Extra-credit assignment for this week: if you'd like to earn some extra-credit points, consider partnering with another student (or two) to create an English tea for the class. Dr. Jadwin will help defray expenses for materials (groceries and tea) and can also help you with logistics and menu-planning. Here's another site with tea ideas.
Week 10William Butler Yeats: shorter poems 
Weekly Writing Assignment due at beginning of class Tuesday (typed, proofread, single-spaced, 1-2 pp.).
Lecture on Yeats and Irish politics; growing old; the work of art
Read biographical essay; "The Lake Isle of Innisfree," "When You Are Old," "Adam's Curse,""The Wild Swans at Coole," "Easter 1916," "The Second Coming."

Listen to Yeats read "The Lake Isle of Innisfree."

Lecture notes on Yeats and his poetry (.pdf file)
Week 11William Butler Yeats: shorter poems 
Weekly Writing Assignment due at beginning of class Tuesday (typed, proofread, single-spaced, 1-2 pp.).
Explication of some later, difficult Yeats poems.
"Among School-Children," "Sailing to Byzantium," "Under Ben Bulben."
Week 12Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway and "Modern Fiction"
Weekly Writing Assignment 10 due at beginning of class Tuesday (typed, proofread, single-spaced, 1-2 pp.).
Lecture on development of modern fiction; impressionism; modernism.
Read biographical essay; the short novel Mrs. Dalloway and the essay "Modern Fiction." Review the essay "The Mark on the Wall" (discussed and read during first week of class).

Lecture notes on Mrs. Dalloway (.pdf file)

Lecture notes on Woolf and Literary Impressionism (.pdf file)
Week 13Thomas Stearns Eliot, shorter poems and an essay
Weekly Writing Assignment due at beginning of class Tuesday (typed, proofread, single-spaced, 1-2 pp.).
Lecture on radicalism and conservatism of Eliot; allusion; cultural capital.
Read biographical essay; the essay "Tradition and the Individual Talent"; "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock"; "The Gift of the Magi"; "Little Gidding". 

Listen to T.S. Eliot reading "The Burial of the Dead"  from "The Wasteland."
Lecture notes on T.S. Eliot and "Prufrock"  (.pdf file)
Lecture notes on Eliot's later poetry (.pdf file)
Week 14

Literature of the Wars
Weekly Writing Assignment due at beginning of class Tuesday (typed, proofread, single-spaced, 1-2 pp.).
Lecture on war poetry and the War Poets; modern war and human history.
(Suggestion: since these readings are spread through the anthology, bookmark their locations so you will be able to find them easily in class.) Read the essay "Voices from World War I" and "Voices from World War II"; Hardy, "In Time of 'The Breaking of Nations'"; Sassoon, "from Memoirs of an Infantry Officer"; " Owen, "Dulce et Decorum Est,"and "Strange Meeting"; W. H. Auden, "Spain 1937" and "Musée des Beaux Arts," Hillary, selection from "The Last Enemy"; Edith Sitwell, "Still Falls the Rain."

Breughel, "The Fall of Icarus" (painting)

The myth of Icarus and Daedalus
Lecture notes on 20th-century war poetry (.pdf file) 

Week 15Final examination, date and time to be announced by Registrar's Office. The final will require you to (1) identify the source and significance of several brief excerpts from course readings and (2) write an essay comparing two excerpts from the literature of the period, explaining how they address differently the issues of the age. 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


st. john fisher college
rochester, NY 14618
585.385.8000
©Lisa Jadwin, 1997-2008. All rights reserved.
Last updated Thursday, March 6, 2008.